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The Spirit of Risk-taking

Hey everyone!

It’s another brand new day! Another day of sharing! What I’m going to share today is very light. It is just some motivation. It is about risk taking! In the sales industry, risk is always there. You don’t know if you are going to make a sale or not but you have to take the risk right? If not, you will never know if you can close that certain deal, especially if you are just standing there, thinking about the scenario all day. I have here a blog posted by Tim J.M. Rohrer of Sales Loudmouth which is “The American Spirit: Risk-taking”. Whether you are American or not, this blog can motivate you and therefore motivate sales.

The American Spirit: Risk-taking

By: Tim J.M. Rohrer

“Sometimes, when we reach for the stars, we fall short. But we must pick ourselves up again and press on despite the pain.” – Ronald Reagan

 
Twenty-seven years ago, space launches had become so consistently predictable that television networks no longer carried them live.  This was even true of the Challenger launch on January 28, 1986 whose mission included carrying the first female astronaut, Christa McAuliffe, into space.  Only the fledgling CNN was on hand to record what has become a seminal event in American history – the explosion seventy-three seconds into the 25th shuttle launch; the subsequent death of seven American astronauts and the resulting three-year lockdown of the space program.
 
McAuliffe was a 37-year old school teacher from Concord, New Hampshire who had been plucked from obscurity by being chosen from 11,000+ applicants as the first participant in NASA’s Teacher in Space Project.  The plan was to reignite the passions of school children for the space program by broadcasting lessons about space from the shuttle after it had reached orbit.  Rather than having a professional astronaut do the teaching, NASA thought it would be extraordinary to choose an educator and then train that person to be an astronaut.  Ultimately, they chose two:  McAuliffe and a back-up named Barbara Morgan.

Finding a more typical or ordinary American to be the first teacher in space would have been difficult.  McAuliffe was born in Boston, MA and was the eldest of five children.  Her father was an accountant, and her mother was a substitute teacher.  She grew up and went to college in Framingham, MA – a suburb of Boston – and settled with her husband in Concord, NH.  By all accounts, she lived her entire life within 100 miles of where she was born.  
 
While her love of the Mercury and Apollo space programs have been documented after the fact, even that interest was very typical of the times.  A friend of hers remembered McAuliffe saying, after John Glenn returned from orbiting the earth in 1962, “Do you realize that someday people will be going to the Moon? . . .and I want to do that!”  But, this was hardly surprising as millions of American children fantasized about being astronauts in the 1960’s.


Instead of becoming an astronaut, McAuliffe became a wife, a mother of two and an educator.  She was a teacher who, according to the NY Times, “emphasized the impact of ordinary people on history, saying they were as important to the historical record as kings, politicians or generals.”  And so it became true that this ordinary American became part of our historical landscape – teaching lessons far beyond those available in her classroom or even those she had prepared for her space mission.

 
McAuliffe taught us or reminded us that ordinary Americans are still amazing humans.  She sought adventure and intended to make a difference far beyond her usual circle of influence.  She was a risk taker who wanted to change her life and enrich the lives of others in the process.  If she hadn’t have died in the process of fulfilling her dream, we probably would have under appreciated her contribution for decades before history fully understand the meaning of her accomplishment (see Lewis and Clark for an example of exactly this type of historical revisionism).  But, that’s okay, because in America we expect people to choose risk because it’s what Americans do and while we recognize it’s value, we move on quickly because its ordinary.  Ordinary in the way that Christa McAuliffe was ordinary.  The American brand of ordinary.
 
Remember Barbara Morgan?  She was the teacher chosen as the back-up to McAuliffe.  She became the ambassador of the Teacher in Space program after the Challenger disaster – working with NASA for a time but eventually returning to her teaching career in Idaho.  If there was anyone we might have excused from a life of risk, it would be Barbara Morgan.  After all, she was at the launch of the Challenger and watched the explosion live with hundreds of school children.  Surely, no one would blame her for going back to a quiet life out of harm’s way.  But, in 1998 Barbara Morgan gave up her safe life and became a full-time NASA astronaut.  In 2007 – the year she turned fifty-six years old, Barbara Morgan flew on her first shuttle mission.  The reason why you’ve probably never heard of her is that she’s an ordinary American.

This is the year that Christa McAuliffe would have turned sixty-five years old.  No doubt she would have been a beloved grandmother and a pillar of her community.  I like to think she would have still lived in New Hampshire and I picture her reading to children who would be oblivious that the gentle lady reading books to them was also the namesake of the library in which they had gathered.  
When my children returned home from elementary school today, I asked them if there had been any mention of the space shuttle, Challenger.  I was disappointed when they said “no”.
So, I showed them video of the launch and I taught them about Christa McAuliffe and Barbara Morgan and I threw in a little about Lewis and Clark and I might have mentioned Paul Revere and George Washington and just for the sake of obscurity I tossed in William H. Seward.  And, I’m sure it didn’t register with them that their ordinary American lives could one day be part of the historical fabric of our nation.
But, maybe, today I took them a little closer to understanding that achievement and success are all tied to risk taking.
Perhaps, I’ve done the same for you.

 

How do you find the story? Does the story inspire you in some ways to take risk? If you are always on the safe side and afraid to take risk, I’m telling you, you are not living your life. Do not put your dreams behind. No one says that reaching dreams is easy but it is not impossible. All you have to do is to take a risk and you would know. Are you a risk-taker?

Respectfully,

Jack

Sales Incentive Programs

Dear Salespeople,

I know you need your daily dose of knowledge of information today so here I am at your service, sharing another great video that I just saw from YouTube (where else?). The topic we have in the video is about sales incentives. Does this excite you? Well, I bet it does! Who doesn’t want it? We all want it right? Companies need it too! They need it to increase staff performance. So it helps everyone, one way or another. Well, I will just let this video talk. This was uploaded by LoyalNationVideos and entitled “Sales Incentive Programs from LoyalNation”. Watch it!

 

Sales Incentive Programs from LoyalNation

By LoyalNationVideos

 

The speaker speaks about the old saying “Money doesn’t buy happiness” and he followed it up with “neither poverty”. All I can say is “hell yeah!”

Well, this is his intro to sales incentive. He said that even though we work for money, it is still not about money. It is about the passion to win. Actually sales incentives creates a healthy competition inside the company and it is great to see that everyone is doing his best to get it and to be the best and there’s nothing wrong with that. It maximizes the potential of the team all year.

The video was cut out but the information is already given. Tell us now, are you driven by sales incentive? If you are a sales manager, do you find sales incentive program helpful? Share us your thoughts!

 

 

Cheers,

 

Jack

Sales Management

Hey People,

I would like to get the attention of the sales management team or the sales manager today because the blog that I saw is for them. It is about sales management on how you handle your sales team. If your team is doing fantastic, it must  be because you are a good leader but if your team is doing poorly, it is time for you to ask yourself “am I a good sales manager for them?”. Your sales people need help from their superior before they do the business. Make sure that they are equipped with the knowledge they need before you let them go to the field. Here’s the article from Ken Thoreson, your sales management guru.

Sales Mgmt:  Understanding “Setting the Hook”

By Ken Thoreson

One of the main jobs of sales management is to help their salespeople see where they are in the sales opportunity.  Are they early? Do they know what they need to know? Do they have an excellent strategy to close?  I like to think that a salesperson is a juggler, tossing X number of opportunities in the air and the sales managers job is to assist the salesperson on judging what opportuniti8es to work , which one’s to toss away and to provide ideas on HOW to work the selected ones

During a few recent client/consulting meetings I realized that this remains an extremely important aspect of any salesperson’s life as well as any sales manager or president of any firm. Exceeding monthly sales objectives are the goals of the sales organization, especially the sales manager. What to do?

First: if you have not subscribed to the “Sales Managers Tool Kit”, atwww.AcumenManagement.com , you can get a free copy of the Sales Strategy Guide by sending me an email:  Ken@AcumenMgmt.com   The Tool Kit contains 40 tools/guides for any sales manager.  The purpose of the  Sales Strategy Guide  is to be used by each salesperson and the sales manager to discuss and strategize on individual sales opportunities and uncover what you know, what you don’t know and develop tactical steps to move the account to conclusion.

Second: The salesperson must know what the “Impact” of your product or services will have on the prospects business. The salesperson must fully understand this question and its answer. You will use it during critical aspects of closing the opportunity.   YOU close for the prospect’s benefit-not the salespersons.

Third: Depending upon your product/services that you offer and vendor relationships, knowing when the prospect wants to be fully utilizing your offering is critical. It is not about “when a decision will be made” it’s about understanding timing and any issues surrounding that timeframe.

Fourth: Knowing early on during the sales process the reason the client will make the decision, the impact of your solution on their company and timing, allows the salesperson to begin to set the hook early. Now I am not suggesting unethical sales tactics, but making sure early in any sales cycle you fully understand the prospect’s key issues allows you control the sales process.

The key element to remember is individuals are always challenged to make a decision, your job, as a trusted advisor is to assist the individual in making the right decision that will impact their business and to help them make it on your time line. This is selling vs order taking.

Being mentally creative and tough and moving your role from simply presenting products/services to providing business guidance moves the role to the next level. It is the job of sales management to assist the salesperson to move forward professionally.

Acumen Management Group Ltd. “operationalizes” sales management systems and processes that pull revenue out of the doldrums into the fresh zone. During the past 14 years, our consulting, advisory, and platform services have illuminated, motivated, and rejuvenated the sales efforts for organizations throughout North America. His latest book is titled: “Leading High Performance Sales Teams”.

As a sales manager, it is your obligation to inform your team about your company and about their role in the business. It is also your duty to motivate them and to bring out the best in them. Remember they are looking up on you. You must be a good example and you must be firmed all the time, to get their full respect! Questions?

Happy selling,

Jack

Building a Business

Hello People!

I have a very interesting blog to share with you right at this moment. This will leave a question in your mind that you will bring the whole day. This is if you are the one who is in control of the company. One of the executives! Are you the Sales President or Sales Vice President? Whatever role you play in the company, your opinion counts, especially if you are responsible for the company’s profit. We make business for profit right? Therefore, we are offering a service or a product for the people. It is a must that we make sure that it is something valuable to them and something they can’t resist. Here is a blog written by Mark LaRosa (@mlarosa), CEO of QuotaCrush.

“Building a Business” means something very different to me.

By Mark LaRosa

I saw this post today on VentureBeat about free courses being offered by Stanford to “Build Your Business

Scan the list… NOT A SINGLE COURSE ON SALES!

It doesn’t matter how much “cryptology” you use, or how good your “graphical models” are, or how “creative you are”  if you can’t get people to buy the product – if you don’t have people who want to PAY you for it.  You will eventually go out of business!    (BTW:  are they seriously trying to teach how to be creative?  isn’t that in your nature or not? of course, I feel the same way about teaching you how to be an entrepreneur, you either are or you aren’t – it can’t be taught).

On the same day, there was a post on Business Insider about how Tumblr ignored revenue for too long and is now feeling the heat.

I say it over and over again, your product does not matter if people don’t want it.  It has to solve a critical problem.  And if you aren’t thinking about sales from day 1, you are already too late.  You don’t build a product for product sake, you build it so that people will buy it – so that you can bring in revenue and make a living for your employees.  Spending some angel’s money or some VC fund’s limited partner’s money just for fun is NOT what being an entrepreneur is about – and it always shocks me that business schools have not figured this out!  There is only one common thread in EVERY company in the world – and that is selling.

In every company that I have started, revenue has always been the main focus in inception.  If I couldn’t think about how the company made money, I moved onto another idea.   The revenue can certainly be indirect, but there has to be a monetization strategy somewhere – otherwise you are just spending investors money “playing company.”

When I have been brought into companies to rescue them, it is always about bringing revenue in- and its certainly much easier when there are plans for this from the get go.

So… certainly take these free classes from Stanford – but don’t forget that “building your product” does not mean “building your business”.  If you are building your “business” then revenue should 100% be a component of that discussion.

How about you? How do you see business? What is your main goal when you are starting up a business? Is it for profit? Of course, it is! Don’t deny it! Though, there are people I know who will answer “to help other people” but in return, the more people they help, the more revenue they get. Do you have any comments? I want to read it on the comment box!

Always,

Jack

10 Ways to Win Your Customer’s Loyalty

Hey Salespeople,

Do you know the right way to make your customers fall in love with your business? Customers are the heart of the business and one business cannot survive with them. It is essential that you win their heart! If you fall short in this aspect, this is the blog that you should read. Selling incentives is okay but it is not enough. The blog here that I am going to share is written by Brian Honigman (@BrianHonigman) from Kissmetrics. He is going to share 10 Ways to Make Customers Fall in Love with Your Business. Read it now and start applying it in your business!

10 Ways to Make Customers Fall in Love with Your Business

By Brian Honigman

Nurturing relationships with your customers is a crucial part of growing a successful business. In this age of automation and innovation, caring for your customers has never been more important.

At any moment, an unhappy customer can share their opinion with the masses through social media and the web and negatively affect your business. That’s why it’s even more important than ever to create an excellent experience for your customers to help develop your company’s relationship with them into love.

Walt Disney said it best, “Do what you do so well that they will want to see it again and bring their friends.” Creating love between your company and your customers can help scale positive word of mouth that’s absolutely priceless.

Creating a customer-focused culture of this nature is a business opportunity that should not be overlooked. Most businesses are failing when it comes to the customer experience, which is your opportunity to swoop in and enchant those same customers into falling for your company.

The data speaks for itself:

  • Only 37% of brands received good or excellent customer experience index scores in 2012. Whereas, 64% of brands got a rating of “OK,” “poor,” or “very poor” from their customers. Source: Forrester Research
  • As many as 89% of consumers began doing business with a competitor following a poor customer experience. Source: RightNow
  • Up to 60% of consumers will pay more for a better customer experience.Source: Desk
  • Average annual value of each customer relationship lost to a competitor or abandoned – $289. Source: Genesys Report

It’s quite clear that now is a good time to solidify your relationship with your customers in a meaningful way. Here are 10 ways to help make your customers fall in love with your business.

1. Treat your Customers Right – Genuinely Interact

Happy customers who get their issue resolved tell 4 to 6 people about their experience. So that’s a way to significantly influence the word of mouth about your business. Don’t act as a nameless or faceless business; genuinely talk with your customers as a person representing the business. Address your customers by name, and tell them your name at the very beginning of your interaction.

AMEX Tweet

Talk to your customers as you would in person, not like you would in a press release. Examples of this are noticeable when it comes to customer service on social media where the genuine shine through and the others seem forced and uptight, which is the opposite of being “social.” American Express does this well onTwitter, ensuring all customer concerns are answered in a timely manner with a friendly and personal response, signed by the employee who’s doing the tweeting.

2. Don’t Come on Too Strong – Respect Your Customers

A third of consumers say they experience rude customer service at least once a month, and 58% of them tell their friends. This is exactly how word of mouth can work against your company’s reputation for the long term. It’s very important to be respectful of a customer’s mood when trying to resolve an issue they have with your company.

Keeping your patience is key to giving your customer the time to air out their issue. And, in turn, it creates the opportunity for you to help resolve the issue and make them comfortable. The more comfortable the customer is the more likely they’ll share valuable feedback that can help prevent similar issues from occurring again in the future.

3. Always Listen – Hear What Your Customers are Saying

At a time when it’s easy to have a two-way dialogue with your customers, it’s important to truly listen. When listening to your customers, take into account what changes your organization should make from this feedback, and then follow through. Your customers are the lifeblood of your organization, and not dealing with the reasonable requests could cause backlash.

Use the following methods to gather feedback from your customers:

  • Surveys
  • Focus Groups
  • Observation
  • Point of Sale
  • Customer Service
  • Social Media
  • Communities and Groups
  • Email and Web Forms

4. Continue to Satisfy – Offer Ongoing Support and Specials

The #1 reason for customer attrition is dissatisfaction with customer service. Do everything in your power to provide excellent service to your customers on an ongoing basis. Respond quickly and enthusiastically, and be ready to present a special offer or discount with the hope of up-selling the customer to buy more.

There’s never any reason to slow down on satisfying your audience, especially when they’re chatting with you live over the phone. It’s important to note that 81% of companies with strong capabilities and competencies for delivering customer experience excellence are outperforming their competition. Take note, customer satisfaction is a key differentiator in a sea of other companies.

Hair Dazzle

Besides offering support, ongoing specials will continue to help enchant and satisfy your customers for the long term. Create engaging multi-channel promotions centered around discounts, giveaways, sweepstakes, and contests. Distribute these offers via email, social media, print, in-store, and across your other marketing channels for full exposure, much like HairDazzle has done on Twitter above.

5. Treat a Customer Like a Valued Partner – Communication is Two Way

As previously mentioned, take your customer’s feedback seriously and act upon reasonable requests. What’s the point of listening if you’re not going to act on that feedback? Make sure it’s clear that you want your customer’s feedback and that your business truly values them as a partner.

If you’re looking for an example of how to show your customer that their opinion matters, look at what the Buffer app team is doing. Buffer app is a social media management tool that helps businesses and individuals schedule their content for the best times to share and get engagement. The Buffer blog features a variety of quality content focused on marketing, achieving happiness, and a monthly series known as the Happiness Report.

Buffer App Happiness Report

This report highlights how the Buffer team is managing customer support each month by what worked well, what didn’t work well, what they plan to work on for the future, and finally, a request for feedback from their customers. This is a lesson for all businesses on how to be completely transparent and actively allow your customers to partake in improving your product for the future. Focusing on your customer to this degree is a major way to strengthen their trust, loyalty, and overall love for your company.

6. Build Trust – Alert Customers to Large Scale Changes, Good or Bad

It takes 12 positive service experiences to make up for 1 negative experience. This is how sensitive trust is between a business and its customers. No matter your size, keep your customers in the know when it comes to positive and negatives changes to your products and services that affect them. It’s crucial to tread lightly when making changes to your products and services because your customers have become accustomed to what you’ve already got.

national geographic facebook

Here’s an example of what not to do.

Recently, Instagram updated its terms of service but neglected to be clear about the changes that would be made to the social network. The wording was confusing, and therefore, the company’s intentions were not clear. Their users immediately voiced concern across the web about these changes. Most of this feedback was outrage and many left the service or threatened to leave, like power user National Geographic. Instagram quickly responded to the outrage andreversed their decision to update their terms of service. In the end, the situation was handled well in terms of the cleanup; but now, due to the poor communication around their terms of service, Instagram has lost the trust of their audience, which is hard to regain.

Here’s what to do to gain trust:

  • Heavily research whether changes to your company could alter public perception.
  • Be methodical in how you communicate the changes to your product and services.
  • Tell your customers when you’ve made a change, you’ve screwed up, or you’ve done something right. A healthy mix will give your customers a transparent look into your company that can’t be forged.
  • Find value in the feedback about your company changes.

7. Be Transparent – Honesty is Crucial When it comes to Mistakes

Being transparent in the digital age is a must. Much like the principles discussed above, transparency is a critical factor in building trust, satisfaction, and love from your customers. What does it mean to be transparent?

company transparency chart

  • Transparency means that you are not afraid of feedback.
  • Transparency means that you have nothing to hide.
  • Transparency means your employees’ personal and work persona blur.
  • Transparency means you like to have conversations with your customers.

8. Follow Through on Your Word – Follow Up on Promises

Your word is your bond. Following up on your promises helps show the transparency of your business, while helping to build a feeling of trust and dependability with your audience.

Manage the expectations of your customers to ensure realistic goals are set and can be met. By remaining consistent in your messaging, your customers will learn what they should expect from you in the future.

F.W. Nichol said it best, “When you get right down to the root of the meaning of the word “succeed,” you find that it simply means to follow through.”

9. Recognize Responsibility – The Customer is Always Right

No matter the circumstance, the customer is always right. This is a rule to guide your business through its growth, from customer service to user experience to product development. To help set this in motion, create a customer service policy to show your customers they are always right. Organize this policy into three parts:

  1. Highlight phrases for your company to use that’ll make your customers happy. Again, consistency and a personal touch go a long way.
  2. Never let your customers forget your business by following up effectively. Keep it personal by following up on special occasions and consistently writing handwritten follow-up notes.
  3. Define how to deal with unsatisfied customers with action steps to ensure there is a thorough process for all employees to follow to resolve a customer issue, ideally turning unhappy customers into your strongest advocates.

10. Always Say “Thank You” – Kindness and Gratitude will Take You Far

Last, but certainly not least, always say “Thank you.” As many as 3 out of 4 customers say they have spent more with a company because of a history of positive experiences. Kindness and gratitude for a customer’s business is an undeniable way to further enchant them for the long term.

Craft every thank you sent out from your company to be specific to the customer, relevancy is key. Be as appreciative as possible to your customers for taking the time to go through the process of resolving their issue. Finally, follow up with a good old fashioned “Thank you.”

Take a look at these 10 golden rules of customer relationship managementvisualized.

I believe that the above mention ways are effective and very easy to apply. Customer as the core of every business should be left happy and satisfied.

As a salesperson or owner of the business what are your ways to make your customer happy? Share your strategy with us!

All the best,

Jack

Recognizing The Value of Your Sales Agents

Hello Peeps!

How are you doing? I have here a blog that a sales manager should read. This blog is written by S. Anthony Iannarino (@iannarino) which talks about sales person recognition. Some of the sales manager often thinks that they are on higher level and the sales agents are just their subordinates. Treating your sales agent as an ordinary employee has an impact on his performance and this is not good for the company. These people have a quota to reach so it is important that they are highly motivated. They bring sales to the company so they must be treated fairly. The incentive scheme is quite effective in recognizing their hard work. So here’s how the author state his opinion.

Underestimating the Value of Being a Great Salesperson

By S. Anthony Iannarino

You have a great offering. Your competitor also has a great offering.

You have a tried and true sales process. Your competitor has a tried and true sales process, too.

You are using the latest and greatest sales methodology. Your competitor is also using the shiny new “new” thing.

Your sales force automation is a modern marvel. Everything you use is integrated into a beautiful, sleek interface with custom dashboards. Your competitor’s SFA is a dead ringer for yours. Only the company logo is different.

You are equipped with the best technology that money can buy. Well, how about that. Ditto your competitor; they’re equally well equipped.

The Difference: You.

We tend to overestimate the impact of some things on sales results and greatly underestimate what’s most important. In any sales organization where the above statements are true, they’re true for every salesperson on the sales team. That means the difference in results is something else, even in your sales organization.

The difference that makes a difference is you, the salesperson. It’s helpful to have a great offering, an effective sales process, good methodologies, and great technology. But it isn’t a substitute for the value created by a great salesperson sitting face-to-face with their dream client.

If you want to improve something that will immediately and irrevocably improve your sales results, you start with the greatest asset you will ever have for producing results: You. You becoming the best ever version of yourself will do more to improve your sales results than anything else.

Questions

What do you substitute for developing your sales skills?

What accounts for the difference in sales results between salespeople in the same organization? Different organizations?

If you could change one thing that would massively improve your results, what would you change?

How much does the salesperson account for in the decision to buy?

Let the employee feel that they are part of business and not just personnel who will do the command. It will degrade them and feel that they can’t do anything without your advice at all times. The initiative to respond in work at their very best will be eradicated once you put on their mind that they do not know anything without you. It is very time consuming also to dictate to them what to do every now and then, right?

Best,

Jack

Motivate Your Self

Hi Folks!

How are you guys?  It is fun to spent time with you again my readers. What a glorious chance we have to learn more today. I am lucky that every day I encounter things that motivate me to do the things positively. With this I am always smiling and laughing with my friends and sisters at home. No negative energy! Well there is no space for negativity to me.  My readers let us talk about “motivation”. I had read an article by Mark Hunter of Sales Hunter. It contains tips to motivate sales. This also tackles the vitality in performing task and responsibilities in organization. So, if you are feeling down today, just read this.

2013 Sales Motivation Tune-Up

By Mark Hunter

profit 300x199 2013 Sales Motivation Tune Up photoWe’re a month into 2013 and it’s not too early to be looking at where you are compared to your yearly number.

Your annual number is to be a motivator, not a “downer,” so use it as just that — a tool to keep you motivated.

Regardless of where you stand year-to-date, it is essential for you to have some successes early on in the year, even if they’re small, to give you some sales motivation.   I’m a firm believer that momentum creates momentum.

Nearly every salesperson I’ve ever talked to has been able to tell me at least one time where it seemed like once the sales started coming, they just kept on coming.

My suggestion is you look at your current number and compare it to where you should be for a month gone in the year.  If you’re there, great! Then challenge yourself to get to that annual number by the end of November.

Pushing yourself to go beyond your number does two things. First, it creates more sales, and second, it protects you should something not go the way you expect it to somewhere through the year.

If you’re not on your number, don’t panic. Relax and assess. There’s plenty of time.

What you want to do is to start looking at some things that have gone right so far.  Write them down and then do two things.  First, celebrate and congratulate yourself for what you’ve been able to accomplish.  Remember my comment about momentum creating momentum.  Many times all it takes is something small going right and then leveraging that into something bigger.

Second, ask yourself why were you successful with that and what can you learn from it and apply elsewhere.

We have 11 months left in the year. That means there is plenty of time to make things happen, but it starts by first reviewing where you’re at now and charting the appropriate course.

Motivation is very important and helpful in performing task and responsibilities smoothly for the growth of the organization where you are working, to increase the productivity. It helps to save time and effort because you are focus.

Don’t compare yourself to anyone because we are born with different personalities, talents and capabilities. Know your strength and use it as an instrument for the self-growth so that you are ready to face the outside world.

Don’t think that you are loser because it is not true. Don’t let other people define of what will be who you are, instead prove that you are the perfect one.  We are all born smart, gorgeous and talented in different aspect.

 

Best,

 

Jack